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Nealon, Jeffrey T.  “Nietzsche’s Money!”  JAC 20 4 (2000):  825-37.  Print.

  • N. begins by drawing attention to the way that capital operates consistently as the “ultimate general equivalent” in both postmodernist and posthumanist discourses at the macro-level.  N. wonders if we should be disgusted by the role of consumer capitalism (as those in the postmodern Frankfurt school argue) or amused by the role of capital in creating multifaceted, complex posthumanist subjectivities (as de Certeau argued in The Practice of Everyday Life) (825).  N. notes that D&G make capital into its own posthumanist, nomadic desiring machine – a machine that makes capitalists of us all.
  • Turning to Nietzsche, N. notes that he despises the bourgeois capitalist’s herd mentality.  Specifically, N. turns to Nietzsche as a way to consider the “slippery symbolic materiality” of our shared capitalist experience: money (827).
  • For Nietzsche money operates as the final completion of the “ascetic priest” – money motivates in much the same way to create humans capable of inhumanity with a good conscience.  In other words, God and money are the same because they are both modes of power (828-9).
  • First Most Will-to-Powerful Law of Nietzschean Personal and Financial Growth:  Both God and money have a common face or perform the same truism:  practices of force and power, not practices of truth and representation.  Said differently (and made very real), finance and capital aren’t representative of anything other than putative consumer confidence. . . finance is a system where capital is truly symbolic and isn’t moored to any representative value (829).
  • This lack of interpretive importance (hermeneutical suspicion) is where Nietzsche and D/G coalesce – N/D/G are practicing a linguistics of flows (doing) rather than a linguistics of the signifier (mean).  They are all interested in language not for what is actually says but with how it creates systems of obedience and resistance (830).
  • Second Most Will-to-Powerful Law of Nietzschean Personal and Financial Growth:  Markets are sites of struggle and risk (money markets, truth markets, etc).  Markets are the sites of social exchange and are dynamic.  As such, a things value is not in itself but in the relation of itself to social force and strife.  As such, a thing’s value is distributed.
  • Third Most Will-to-Powerful Law of Nietzschean Personal and Financial Growth:  all good things are bathed in blood at their original (or, “Man is the measure of all things”).  And, because man has measured himself through systems of exchange and commodity, the problem seems to be the exterior forces of capitalism; however, the problem is actually the subjectivity that capitalism produces and rewards.
  • Fourth Most Will-to-Powerful Law of Nietzschean Personal and Financial Growth:  don’t moralistically denounce or judge capital; instead, experiment with its speeds and slowness – see what (else) it can do (834).  In other words, don’t condemn capitalism – condemn the ways that it currently creates misery in the hopes of producing a different capitalism that could create a “different series of outputs” (835).  The only way out of capitalism is through it – through the new lines of flight it offers, through its deterritorializing movements.
  • Fifth Most Will-to-Powerful Law of Nietzschean Personal and Financial Growth:  you are not a subject but a “mutual fund”; or, said differently, you are an assemblage.  Don’t worry about your symptoms and instead revise and diversify your “portfolio” (836).

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  Tag: deterritorialization